Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

Assessment of acquired brain injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: guidance for DisabilityCare Australia

Posted on: 18 November, 2013
Issue: Vol 13 No 4, October 2013 - December 2013
Related to Cultural ways Disability Injury Workforce

Bohanna I, Sthephens A, Wargent JC, Timms C, Graham D, Clough A (2013)
Assessment of acquired brain injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians: guidance for DisabilityCare Australia
Ryde, NSW: Brain Injury Australia

This report contains recommendations for the delivery of culturally competent and acceptable assessment, access to treatment and ongoing care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have an acquired brain injury (ABI).

The report was commissioned because of recognition that for some population groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with a disability, equitable benefit can only be achieved if additional and specialised measures are developed and implemented to overcome disadvantage.

Funding was provided by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs to develop a report on how to prepare individuals, communities and services for the transition to the Australian Government’s national disability scheme, DisabilityCare Australia. Brain Injury Australia and Synapse co-managed the project, and research was conducted by James Cook University.

Topics covered in the report include:

  • an engagement, planning and assessment framework for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people affected by an ABI
  • the development of a culturally acceptable instrument or toolkit for assessing functioning, cognitive impairment and care and support needs
  • the requirement for accredited training of people working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who have an ABI
  • a framework for DisabilityCare Australia assessor training and organisational capacity building
  • general recommendations.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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