Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

Bloodborne viral and sexually transmitted infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: surveillance and evaluation report 2010

Posted on: 10 January, 2011
Issue: Vol 11 No 1, January 2011 – March 2011
Related to Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Sexual health Illicit drug use

National Centre in HIV Epidemiology & Clinical Research (2010)
Bloodborne viral and sexually transmitted infections in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: surveillance and evaluation report 2010
Sydney, NSW: National Centre in HIV Epidemiology & Clinical Research, University of New South Wales

This annual report provides statistical information on the incidence of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and bloodborne viruses (BBVs) among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and other Australians. In most instances, the data utilised in this report are to the end of 2009 and relate specifically to chlamydia, donovanosis, gonorrhoea, syphilis, HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Consistent with previous surveillance reports, this report reveals that Indigenous peoples continue to experience significantly higher rates of STIs and BBVs when compared with non-Indigenous Australians. Numerous factors are identified as contributing to the higher rates of STIs and BBVs in the Indigenous population including: less access to health services; shortage of clinical staff; transmission dynamics; high rates of screening; a younger, more mobile population; socioeconomic disadvantage; shame and historical factors; and mainstream STI and BBV social marketing messages. Ultimately this report seeks to encourage further dialogue on minimising the risks associated with the transmission of STIs and BBVs among Indigenous peoples, as well as the resultant personal and social implications.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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