Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2006-07: an analysis by remoteness and disease

Posted on: 3 November, 2010
Issue: Vol 10 No 4, October - December 2010
Related to Health measurement Health services Hospitalisation Remote Rural Urban Services

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2010)
Expenditure on health for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 2006-07: an analysis by remoteness and disease
Canberra: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This report examines the expenditure estimates for Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians at a regional level and the analysis offers information on the differences in service use.  The report was produced at the request of the Australian Health Ministers Advisory Council.

  • Health expenditure per person on selected services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people varied across remoteness areas but generally increased with remoteness.
  • Medicare Benefits Expenditure Scheme spending per person was generally lower for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across remoteness areas.
  • Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme spending per person was highest for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in remote/very remote areas but was higher for non-Indigenous Australians in inner regional areas and major cities.
  • Hospital admission rates for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were higher than non-Indigenous rates.
  • The cost of hospital admission across all remoteness areas was higher for Indigenous than non-Indigenous people.
  • Hospital care involving dialysis were responsible for the highest proportion of hospital admissions for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
  • Renal disease, mental and behavioural disorders and maternal conditions had the highest expenditure for Indigenous hospital admissions. For non-Indigenous hospital admissions the highest expenditure were for cardiovascular disease, unintentional injuries and cancer.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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