Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

‘It fits the needs of the community’: long-term evaluation of the Norseman Voluntary Liquor Agreement

Posted on: 18 April, 2016
Issue: Vol 16 No 2, April 2016 – June 2016
Related to Alcohol use Western Australia

Midford R, McKenzie J, Mayhead R (2016)
‘It fits the needs of the community’: long-term evaluation of the Norseman Voluntary Liquor Agreement
Darwin: Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education

In the early 2000s, members of the Aboriginal community in Norseman, in Western Australia (WA) became concerned about heavy alcohol use within the community. From the idea that specific alcoholic beverages were associated with heavy drinking, a proposed restriction on the sale of such beverages was outlined by the Aboriginal community. The following actions resulted:

  • a restrictive alcohol agreement was implemented in 2008
  • the impact of the restriction was evaluated in 2009
  • the restriction was found to be successful
  • the restriction was extended.

This report builds on the original evaluation, to assess whether the agreement has been able to maintain its initial benefits. The key finding was that alcohol restrictions can have a long-term positive benefit when initiated and supported by the community. One recommendation handed down in this report is that the Norseman community should be encouraged and supported to revisit their restrictive practices in the sale of fortified and non-fortified wines. Further, that a restriction on the sale of spirits should also be considered. The report was written for health workers and policy makers through the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE).

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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