Theses (published elsewhere)

Martu tjitji pakani: Martu child rearing and its implications for the child welfare system

Posted on: 14 April, 2010
Issue: Vol 10 No 2, April 2010 - June 2010
Related to Cultural ways Infants and young children Western Australia

Jewell T (2009)
Martu tjitji pakani: Martu child rearing and its implications for the child welfare system.
University of Western Australia, Perth, WA

In this research, the author explores the belief that a reason for continuing poor outcomes for Indigenous people is that State-wide and national programs have ignored local Indigenous culture and did not actively involve local Indigenous people in the development of programs for their area. This perception was explored through investigation of the tension between Indigenous culture and worldview and the dominant White values of the child welfare system, in reference to Martu child rearing practices and beliefs. The research considers Martu child rearing practices, in the remote town of Wiluna in Western Australia, in relation to the broadly defined child welfare system. The conclusions drawn are that to improve outcomes for Martu children and their families, agencies need to deliver services through close working relationships with the Martu and allow Martu control, definition of priorities and development of strategies to address the problems and operate within, understand, appreciate, and respect Martu Law and culture and understand post colonisation histories.

Adapted from an Australasian Digital Thesis Program abstract

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