Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

Third national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmissible Infections strategy 2010 – 2013

Posted on: 6 July, 2010
Issue: Vol 10 No 3, July 2010 - September 2010
Related to Infectious conditions Sexual health

Australian Department of Health and Ageing (2010)
Third national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander blood borne viruses and sexually transmissible infections strategy 2010 – 2013
Canberra: Department of Health and Ageing, Australia

The Third National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Blood Borne Viruses and Sexually Transmissible Infections Strategy was released in March 2010. It is one of a set of five national strategies aimed at reducing the transmission of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and blood borne viruses (BBVs) and their morbidity, mortality and personal and social impacts.

The strategy highlights ongoing challenges in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities relating to STIs and BBVs. These include:

  • sustained and unacceptably high rates of bacterial STIs in many remote communities
  • the rate of acquisition of HIV and viral hepatitis through injecting drug use
  • ongoing incidence of HIV infections among men who have sex with men
  • lack of access for many communities to culturally appropriate primary health care services.

The new priority action areas identified in the strategy are:

  • annual, routine and systematic testing, treatment and follow-up for bacterial STIs of sexually active Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people
  • increased access to treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people who test positive to bacterial STIs;
  • increased primary prevention activities that seek to reduce the number of new cases of HIV and viral hepatitis among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who inject drugs
  • competent and accredited workforces consistent across all jurisdictions to address the scope of work outlined in the strategy.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

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