The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey for 2018-19

Current topic
Published in the HealthBulletin Journal
Posted on:
23 July, 2018

The health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait people has been improving over the last two decades.

The most recent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey showed that smoking rates have decreased from nearly one in two people over the age of 15 in 2002 (49%) to less than two in five (39%) in 2014-15. The number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people drinking alcohol at levels that cause short-term and lifetime risk has also decreased.

The next Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey has now commenced with interviewers to visit all states of Australia in urban, regional and remote communities to create a national picture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.

The survey will run until March 2019 with the first survey results available from late 2019. It will collect detailed information about health and health-related actions, and is a key dataset for understanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and wellbeing. Results will assist in the administration, evaluation and planning of health and social policies and programs and services. Previous results have been used to revise blood pressure test guidelines and promote quit smoking campaigns.

For the first time, this Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health survey will include voluntary hearing tests. The survey also collects a range of information about social wellbeing.

Shellie Morris, a proud Warduman and Yanyuwa woman and the 2014 NAIDOC National Artist of the Year, said ‘If the health survey knocks on your door, make sure you get involved. Everyone’s story matters. Do it for yourself and do it for your community’ .

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

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