Reports and publications (published elsewhere)

Research to inform the development of the Youth Diversion Communication Strategy in the East Kimberly and Central Desert Region: final report

Posted on: 9 August, 2010
Issue: Vol 10 No 3, July 2010 - September 2010
Related to Cultural ways Health promotion Policies Young adults Remote Rural Substance use Northern Territory Western Australia

Cultural & Indigenous Research Centre Australia (2010)
Research to inform the development of the Youth Diversion Communication Strategy in the East Kimberly and Central Desert Region: final report
Canberra: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs

This research was conducted by the Cultural and Indigenous Research Centre Australia (CIRCA) on behalf of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA). The aim of the research was to inform future communication strategies and policy designed to reduce the incidence of substance abuse among Aboriginal young people in the East Kimberly and Central Desert Regions. Researchers conducted stakeholder interviews in the Northern Territory (NT) and Western Australia (WA), including site visits to Docker River (NT) and Kununurra (WA) between September and October 2009.

One of the major findings of this research is that communications are not seen as a priority for addressing Volatile Substance Abuse (VSA) among Aboriginal young people. Instead of funding communications, providing significant funding and support for Youth diversion programs was identified as a way to have the greatest impact on VSA.

The research identified that the most likely way to use communications development to impact substance misuse was to work with at-risk youth to design and develop resources that target other young people. This method can effectively engage youth with key messages on harm minimisation and prevention, and educate them on the long term affects of substance misuse. When considering the most effective way to use message delivery for young people in the central desert and Kimberley regions, the research indicates that a fluid, dynamic and interactive communication strategy is most appropriate.

Different strategies are needed to address different population groups including: young people; key influencers: families, elders and community leaders; youth workers; retailers; and non-Indigenous residents.

Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet abstract

scroll to the top